You could be an affiliate for anything. It could be an actual affiliate product, for instance, a car, or anything. Or maybe if you are in network marketing then you are an affiliate for that company’s product but the compensation is just different. If you are in direct sales, then you are an affiliate marketer. Even being an insurance seller makes you an affiliate marketer because you are an affiliate for that particular insurance company’s policies.
Whenever we see a blog post catch on in search for one of the blogs we manage, we celebrate, because it will probably send lots of traffic to the site over time. Unless you have a massive email list or rely entirely on Facebook shares like BuzzFeed-type sites, you should aim to get a good portion of your traffic from search. (Though a massive email list and lots of Facebook shares are pretty great too, and will help your site catch on in search… so all of these traffic-generating activities feed into one another.)

Affiliate marketing is commonly confused with referral marketing, as both forms of marketing use third parties to drive sales to the retailer. The two forms of marketing are differentiated, however, in how they drive sales, where affiliate marketing relies purely on financial motivations, while referral marketing relies more on trust and personal relationships.[citation needed]

×