A published author and professional speaker, David Weedmark has advised businesses and governments on technology, media and marketing for more than 20 years. He has taught computer science at Algonquin College, has started three successful businesses, and has written hundreds of articles for newspapers and magazines throughout Canada and the United States.
I struggle with the concept of being paid for what we can control. As a sales person, there were a number of years when I missed my quota, and missed major commission payments, not becasue I didn’t “get the order,” but because the company couldn’t ship, there was a product problem or something else outside my control. As a sales person, you swallow real hard, do everything you can to work around those issues and still achieve your goal. Sometimes you can’t, just because “it’s out of your control.” I remember one year, when I managed a very large sales force, most of my people missed numbers and major commission/incentive payments just because of a major issue the company faced with the manufacturability of some product lines. In the past year I’ve had many of the sales people in some of my clients in the electronic components business face the same thing. The people didn’t make their numbers, they didn’t get paid, they didn’t achieve their goals–and it wasn’t their fault. From a performance management point of view, we didn’t fire a single person because they didn’t make their numbers. But they missed out on $10’s of thousands of commissions.
If the positions are certified on the basis of statements issued by a third-party bank, we record the positions at the end of the month. We calculate an average on the basis of the positions at the end of each month (previous month and current month). This average is charged for each day of the month and we use the daily NAV to calculate the marketing commission.
For 17 years, we’ve partnered with digital marketers like you to sell our products to over 200 million customers around the globe. Our digital marketers stick with our Affiliate Network because of our ever-expanding catalog of quality digital products and unsurpassed reputation for reliability – we pay commissions on time, every time so you never have to worry about when you will get paid.
Conversion rate optimization is still possibly one of the most underutilized but critical functions of digital marketing. Every element of digital marketing is useless without considering conversion rates. This goes for SEO, SEM, Social Media, Email, and Display. The power of your SEO rankings are only as good as your click through rates and your traffic is only valuable of your website and landing pages foster some type of “action.” Why spend all the time and energy driving traffic through multiple different channels if you are not willing to spend the time and energy on conversion optimization? Yet many brands and agencies still put less emphasis on this crucial piece of the puzzle.

It can be published as a book, and other people have already suggested what to include into ‘part 2’. As someone who has been asked by other people wanting to promote my products/serviced, I’d love to read about the merchant’s side of AM, e.g. various software that can be used, how to choose affiliate partners, what to include in the agreement, etc.
Using influencers to market your products or services is a great way to quickly saturate yourself into the marketplace, no matter what you're peddling. However, finding the right influencer at the right price is the hard part. You don't necessarily have to go to the top-tier influencers; you can also opt for micro-influencers (those that have 10,000 to 100,000 followers or fans).
The success of an affiliate marketing strategy depends on how many referrals you’re able to send to merchant sites and how well these referrals convert (hence the bolding of these factors above). The more relevant and appealing the offers you highlight on your site, the higher both your click and conversion rates will likely be. If you’re running a travel blog, you probably don’t want to be featuring affiliate offers for baby products; replacing them with affiliate links to cruise packages would probably result in a higher referral rate.

The concept of affiliate marketing on the Internet was conceived of, put into practice and patented by William J. Tobin, the founder of PC Flowers & Gifts. Launched on the Prodigy Network in 1989, PC Flowers & Gifts remained on the service until 1996. By 1993, PC Flowers & Gifts generated sales in excess of $6 million per year on the Prodigy service. In 1998, PC Flowers and Gifts developed the business model of paying a commission on sales to the Prodigy Network.[8][9]

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