In all our jobs, whether sales, marketing, or whatever, there are lots of things that are outside our control. That doesn’t take away from our accountability to achieve results, and sometimes we just have to suck it up. I really do think marketing should be accountable for sales/revenue. Maybe the specific metrics might be different. Where a sales person might be accountable for revenue from a territory, a marketing person might be accountable for a product line, for overall revenue, for a market segment, or something else.
(f) are directed toward children or knowingly collect, use, or disclose personal information from children under 13 years of age or other applicable age threshold (as defined by applicable laws and regulations); or violate any applicable laws, ordinances, rules, regulations, orders, licenses, permits, guidelines, codes of practice, industry standards, self-regulatory rules, judgments, decisions, or other requirements of any applicable governmental authority related to child protection (for example, if applicable, the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (15 U.S.C. §§ 6501-6506) or any regulations promulgated thereunder or the Children’s Online Protection Act);
I could have promoted WP Engine (hosting company) for $200/sale with no tier program to climb – sounds pretty good right? But when I checked ShareASale I saw their reversal rates were 24%! Just to give you an idea SiteGround’s reversals are less than 10%. WP Engine starts at $29/month while SiteGround’s is $3.95/month, plus SiteGround has a better reputation. I had to climb a tier program to get SiteGround’s $150/sale, but long-term my research paid off.
Susan, thanks for the comment, particularly helping clarify some confusing misimpressions I may have created in the post. I did say, and do mean (at least for B2B) that marketing is repsonisble to support sales–meaning both the sales function and revenue generation in general, but I didn’t mean that was it’s only responsibility of marketing. There are many other function that marketing is responsible for, that could include product marketing and other functions. Having made that disclaimer, you raise several other interesting points, I’ll kind of react randomly.
When formulating a commission structure, the first step is to consider all stakeholders involved in the transaction. Even though affiliate marketing is entirely performance-based — and nary a nickel gets paid unless a transaction occurs — there are several different parties taking a cut of that sale. The affiliate gets a percentage. The affiliate network gets a percentage. And, your affiliate manager might take a percentage. What initially seemed as a no-risk marketing channel could be one of your most expensive.
In February 2000, Amazon announced that it had been granted a patent[18] on components of an affiliate program. The patent application was submitted in June 1997, which predates most affiliate programs, but not PC Flowers & Gifts.com (October 1994), AutoWeb.com (October 1995), Kbkids.com/BrainPlay.com (January 1996), EPage (April 1996), and several others.[13]
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