Some advertisers offer multi-tier programs that distribute commission into a hierarchical referral network of sign-ups and sub-partners. In practical terms, publisher "A" signs up to the program with an advertiser and gets rewarded for the agreed activity conducted by a referred visitor. If publisher "A" attracts publishers "B" and "C" to sign up for the same program using his sign-up code, all future activities performed by publishers "B" and "C" will result in additional commission (at a lower rate) for publisher "A".

The best analysts and affiliate managers will be able to interpret this data and use it to their advantage. For instance, lower-value partners –those who are commonly credited for driving actions when high buyer intent already exists (e.g. at the point of check-out) or who poach traffic from other channels—can expect to see their payouts adjusted accordingly.
Commissions can eat into an investor’s returns. Suppose Susan buys 100 shares of Conglomo Corporation for $10 each. Her broker charges a 2.5% commission on the deal, so Susan pays $1,000 for the shares, plus another $25. Six months later, her shares have appreciated 10% and Susan wants to sell them. Her broker charges a 2% commission on the sale, or $22. Susan’s investment earned her a $100 profit, but she paid $47 in commissions on the two transactions. So her net gain is only $53.

When formulating a commission structure, the first step is to consider all stakeholders involved in the transaction. Even though affiliate marketing is entirely performance-based — and nary a nickel gets paid unless a transaction occurs — there are several different parties taking a cut of that sale. The affiliate gets a percentage. The affiliate network gets a percentage. And, your affiliate manager might take a percentage. What initially seemed as a no-risk marketing channel could be one of your most expensive.
He is the co-founder of Neil Patel Digital. The Wall Street Journal calls him a top influencer on the web, Forbes says he is one of the top 10 marketers, and Entrepreneur Magazine says he created one of the 100 most brilliant companies. Neil is a New York Times bestselling author and was recognized as a top 100 entrepreneur under the age of 30 by President Obama and a top 100 entrepreneur under the age of 35 by the United Nations.
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